Philip Johnson’s Glass House Sculpture Gallery Re-Opens (+ Photos)

In August of 2015 I went to Philip Johnson’s Glass House with Sal, as a part of a wild week-and-a-half trip around art and architecture sites in Upstate New York. We were unable to visit the sculpture gallery in full, because it was being renovated. I’ve just heard that it’s open again, however – perhaps another trip is warranted?

Have you been to the Glass House? Will you be planning a trip now that the sculpture gallery is open?

Here are some of the photos I took on our visit. Leave a comment to let me know: could you live in a house with glass walls, if it was secluded as this one is?

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The Glass House
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Absolute desk goals
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Andy Warhol slept here

Design Thinking: Veganism, Constraints & Innovation

I’m not a vegan, but I play one in design thinking workshops. Why? Vegan cuisine is a great example of design constraints in action.

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My “frustrated” face

Over the years I’ve handed down a lot of design assignments to students and workshop participants. These assignments range from “ideate something that can happen on a cell phone that would help a new person feel welcome in your city” to “create a time-keeping device┬áthat expresses your future career goals.” Whatever the goal of the assignment, the reaction is typically the same: people are frustrated by constraints.

When I tell students that their time-keeping device can only be made out of the six objects in the box in front of them (including a rock and a piece of red string), they immediately ask about adding additional items. When I tell workshop participants that their “welcome wagon” must include a cell phone interaction, they ask about building a community center. Some people – at this exact moment in their relationship with me – probably look at me and think What a crazy jerk. If only she’d let me use my idea it would be so good!

So why do I try to constrain design in specific and often weird ways? Because the alternative is watching people flounder for inspiration, stick to what they already know, or bite off more than they can chew. Providing clear and often extreme restraints in a design exercise is the same as guiding a graduate student to pick a very specific thesis topic: it clarifies the work in the long run and prevents important discoveries from being lost under a mountain of other information. In my experience (and I’m probably biased) by the end of these projects, learners see the value of those tight, strange guidelines they were given.

At this point, you’re probably wondering when I’m going to talk about veganism… Well, here it is. I think vegan cuisine makes an excellent case study of how seemingly extreme constraints can lead to a flourishing of innovative solutions.

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