Finger Lakes Wine: Preferred Pairings at Lakewood Vineyards with Tumino Cheese

A trip to the Seneca Lake Wine Trail for wine and cheese – the perfect way to spend a winter weekend!

Last Saturday I took a mid-day trip to Seneca Lake with my friend and co-worker, Caitlin, for the Seneca Lake Wine Trail’s March Preferred Pairings event. We both enjoy visiting Seneca, even in winter weather, and we were extra-excited to see one of our friends from our work at Rev, Ithaca’s business incubator: Tumino Cheese Company.

For Preferred Pairings, Mariann and John Fessenden of Tumino partnered with Lakewood Vineyards. Neither Caitlin nor I had been to Lakewood before, and we agreed that we were glad we had been guided to their tasting room. The view was lovely, the staff friendly, and the wines they poured were all great pairings.

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The main tasting room at Lakewood Vineyards

Tumino focused very closely on a particular style of Italian cheese called toma. Toma is a farmer’s cheese, and the Tumino team experiments with different aging and flavoring to get maximum variety out of this style. Tumino also uses exclusively Jersey milk, which is richer than the milk you buy in bottles at the store. The higher fat content gives their cheese a delectable smoothness.

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I love meeting people who love their work, and everyone working this event was visibly brimming with happy energy. I was impressed with Mariann’s expertise and enthusiasm for the subtleties of the cheese-making process; when she’s describing curd, she glows! Her husband, John, was working the sample table, and he walked us through the styles with a relaxed, friendly attitude. Working for Lakewood was Tracy – a great addition to the crew, since he’s clearly sampled the cheeses himself and can speak clearly about both the wine and the food.

For the tasting, we sampled:

  • Kidders Toma with Black Pepper, paired with Lakewood’s Cabernet Franc 2014
    • This cheese is one of Tumino’s flagship products, featuring a light touch of black peppercorns. Mariann says the addition of the black pepper early on changes the fermentation ever so slightly (by reducing some types of bacteria and not others), resulting in a noticeably different texture. The cheese was firm but creamy, a really enjoyable mouth-feel, and it paired nicely with the light Cabernet Franc. Caitlin, who is a black pepper fiend, loved this cheese.
  • Old Grey Mare Toma, paired with Sparkling Catawba 2015
    • Described as a “cooking cheese,” Old Grey Mare falls somewhere on the asiago to dry mozzarella spectrum. It was a nice nibble, but I would have liked it best mixed into a pasta dish or salad. The bite of the cheese went well with the wine, which is made from an American grape variety. I don’t always enjoy the juicy wines made from American grapes, but this pairing was very tasty and completely won me over.
  • Song Toma with Juniper Berries, paired with Niagara 2016
    • This cheese was my favorite, with a lovely texture and the unique addition of strong juniper flavor. Mariann described this as an Italian alps riff on toma, because of the use of the juniper berries. While I must admit it was a good pairing with the Niagara, I would not personally drink this sweeter wine alone – I’m rarely interested in sweet wines. The Finger Lakes do produce some great “grape juice” varieties, and if you enjoy the juicy, higher residual sugar wines, take my disinterest in this one as a sign that you might enjoy it!
  • Razzle’s Choice Toma, paired with Vignoles 2015
    • A close second for favorite cheeses, the Razzle’s Choice includes a high dose of cayenne flakes. Unlike other “pepper” cheeses I’ve tasted, this one actually bursts with flavor and has a nice warm burn to it; I immediately imagined putting it on crackers with sweet jams and dried fruits, while Caitlin started talking about melting it on pasta. We were both quite inspired by the flavors. It was paired with the Vignoles, a wine that surprised me. Remember how I just said I’m not a fan of most sweeter wines? Well, I could certainly picture myself drinking this Vignoles on a hot day with mouth-searing tacos. Tracy, who was pouring for us, said he also likes this cheese with beer.

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  • Captain Ogden Toma, paired with Glaciovinum 2015
    • This cheese is part skim and aged for longer than the other Tumino tomas, and my notes next to it state: YUM! It has a drier, firmer texture than the others on this list and a nice, nutty bite to it. I think this would make a great addition to any cheese plate, since even one bite of it shows of the unique flavor and texture. And, as you may have guessed, Glaciovium is ice wine… and my lack of enthusiasm for ice wines means I cannot give you an accurate picture of how you might like it. All the tasting notes were present (especially tropical fruits) and this wine is an award-winner, so I will let that speak to its quality. Anyone who enjoys ice wine and has tried this, please share a comment below to let us know what you think!

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After our tasting, Tracy recommended we go on to Miles Wine Cellars for our next stop; it was great advice. If you live in the area, take a moment to visit their website; they are planning to host a whole variety of fun events in the warmer weather, including some in their boat house down on the lake!

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Miles Wine Cellars is on the shores of Seneca Lake in a beautiful Greek Revival house! Brr.

I hope you enjoyed this post; I’m trying to hit more events in the region, to share with you the local flavors that I love. Finger Lakes wine hasn’t always had a great reputation, but I think the regional strengths in dry white wines and (in my non-sommelier opinion)  increasingly good rosé of cabernet franc are worth a mention. I don’t recommend people come to the Finger Lakes looking for lush, full reds; I do stand by our crisp whites and summery rosés… and excellent cheeses to pair with any drink!

Be sure to visit the Seneca Lake Wine Trail’s events website – they have more great events coming up very soon, including a Pasta and Wine Weekend that I wish I was able to attend. Instead, though, I suspect I’ll be on a mission to a certain sugar shack for buckwheat pancakes before the season is over… Stay tuned and follow me on Instagram for pictures of food, wine, and more.

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Paris for New Year’s: Day 4

The day on which we had “Parisian date night,” and when I found my most and least favorite museums of the trip.

By now, some of you may be wondering how I can write about such details from a trip we took a year and a half ago. The answer is simple: we keep a little notebook. Each morning while we ate breakfast, we recorded what we had done the day before and planned what to do on that day.  And as I said in my last post, this was about the point in the trip where I got un petit mal du gorge – a little sore throat – which lasted for the rest of the trip. Being the sweetheart that he is, Sal took it upon himself to record our activities on this day. I have a difficult time reading his handwriting, but I’ve tried to preserve his voice a bit as I describe this day.

Despite the sore throat, this day is a very fond memory. On this day, we went to what has become one of my favorite museums, we ate the best steak frites I had on the whole trip, we saw bunny rabbits, and we had some very traditional – but unusual – fun at the end of the day. Read along to see what happened.

As I said, I was a little sick this morning with a scratchy throat. We slept late and ate a nice apricot custard tart from the fridge – part of our local market haul on the first day. Then we set out to the 7th arrondissement, a neighborhood on the Left bank where embassies and aristocratic households are – including the Hôtel Biron, home of the Paris section of the Musee Rodin. The Hôtel Biron is unique in that it is fully free-standing and set back from the streets, surrounded on all sides by formal gardens instead of nestled up against an entry courtyard. Rodin lived in the hotel in the early 1900’s and was quite taken with the idea that the building should become a museum to his life’s work. To ensure this end, he left his studio, work, and papers to the city of Paris upon his death.

Continue reading “Paris for New Year’s: Day 4”

Paris for New Year’s: Day 3

Ah, our third day in Paris… henceforth to be known as the day we walked nearly 14 miles. Our combined love of museums and my own issues with anxiety and crowds bounced us around some well-known destinations: the Louvre, Angelina, the Galeries Lafayette, and the Palais Royal. We also ended the day with a very special discovery, which that has become a fond memory for both of us.

For New Year’s 2015, I went to Paris for eight days with my well-dressed partner in crime, Salvatore. I started to write it up last year but put my blog on hold for a while – so here is the rest of the series. You can start reading here.

This a longer post with many photos, because that’s what I personally enjoy in a travel blog. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below and I’ll answer you. J’apprends le français, desole pour mes erreurs.

Ah, our third day in Paris… henceforth to be known as the day we walked nearly 14 miles. Our combined love of museums and my own issues with anxiety and crowds bounced us around some well-known destinations: the Louvre, Angelina, the Galeries Lafayette, and the Palais Royal. We also ended the day with a very special discovery, which that has become a fond memory for both of us.

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We woke early so that we could get breakfast and head to the Louvre to beat the lines. We ate at the café downstairs from our flat, La Rose de France. This charming café became our daily spot for petit dejeuner because of the extra-extra-buttery croissants, the quirky velvet décor, and the fascinating proprietor. She seemed a force to be reckoned with. I don’t have many photos of the interior because – while polite and welcoming – she seemed to notice when I had my camera out and didn’t look pleased by it. I may have misread her attitude, but it seemed best to err on the side of respecting boundaries. Visit their website to see how cute it is. If you ever visit and wonder where the storage is, I’ll tell you a little secret: it’s under a trap door in the floor!

Continue reading “Paris for New Year’s: Day 3”

Local Market: Foodtrepreneurs & Dairy-Free Yogurt

A quick round-up of plants, veggies, and local treats from the past weekend – including dairy-free yogurt and a local food startup.

After finally recovering from a nasty winter cold/sinus infection, I ventured out on a bright, warm Saturday with my good friend Caitlin. We went to the Ithaca Farmers Market and our local food co-op, Greenstar. Here’s a quick post to share what we got – and to tell you about one of my favorite local food startups.

Fun fact: I work at a business incubator called Rev: Ithaca Startup Works (my job is for the center at Cornell that built Rev, among other programs). Because Upstate New York is full of food and beverage startups, my job introduces me to a lot of “foodtrepreneurs.” If you’re interested in learning more about our local food innovators, leave a comment below.

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This post has been brought to you by the world’s sexiest cabbage.

Continue reading “Local Market: Foodtrepreneurs & Dairy-Free Yogurt”

Paris for New Year’s: Day 2

For New Year’s 2015, I went to Paris for eight days with my well-dressed partner in crime, Salvatore. I started to write it up last year but put my blog on hold for a while – so here is the rest of the series. You can start reading here.

This a longer post with many photos, because that’s what I personally enjoy in a travel blog. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below and I’ll answer you. J’apprends le français, desole pour mes erreurs.

We rented an Air BnB in Place Dauphine for our trip, and when we woke up our first morning, I had no regrets about paying a little extra for the location. I could lean out our top-floor window and peer down into the triangular park below. People starting their day crossed the bare each between benches and little Christmas trees.

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For breakfast, we ate the bounty of last night’s walk: pain levain, tiny apricots, and a sheep’s milk cheese from La Fromagerie de L’Isle. Then we set out with a particular mission in mind; my half-brother, Mark, had heard we were going to Paris and given us a card with a $20 bill inside and these instructions:

“Take this money and change it into euros. Then go an area you haven’t explored yet and walk down an interesting-looking street until you see an interesting-looking café. Go inside and get two coffees and two croissants. Look up and take a photo of whatever you see from where you’re sitting. Send it to me – that’s my souvenir.”

Continue reading “Paris for New Year’s: Day 2”

Local Market: February 4, 2017

A weekly report from the farmers’ market, with a salad idea and recipe for basic vinaigrette.

I love to eat locally and in season, because keeping track of the shifting options at the market helps me pay attention to subtle changes in the season. One example: for at lest three of the past weekends, there has been gorgeous radicchio at the Ithaca Farmers’ Market.

This past weekend I went, intending to get some heads of it to make a salad – for which my friend Hannes wanted the recipe – to share on this blog. But, just like that, no radicchio. Did someone else get it all? Is it a sign of a minute shift toward spring (even though it feels like it will never come)? I don’t know, but time will tell.

Instead, I found a great selection of leafy greens and root veggies to inspire me. Keep an eye on this blog for a chard frittata recipe, coming on Thursday morning. In the meantime, here’s a look and what I got… and the little salad I couldn’t resist making after unpacking it all.

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Continue reading “Local Market: February 4, 2017”